Monday, January 16, 2012

Appreciating a Songbird - Cedar Waxwing


Digiscoped Cedar Waxwing

That Cedar Waxwings often perch nearly motionless for extended periods makes them perfect bird portraiture subjects. But for their high-pitched and forlorn calls, they're quiet sentinels of the branch. When hearing a waxwing call, I'm never too sure how many I've stumbled upon until I actually look up and count them. Their calls are so soft that they blend together sounding like a single bird. They're exhibit a high degree of sociality during winter, so it's not uncommon to find a dozen or more of these elegant little birds perched together in a single fruit-bearing tree during winter. You can find such flocks almost anywhere there are trees with berries, even in your own backyard. Check out this poem I wrote a few years ago about waxwings!

Pheasant Branch, Dane, US-WI
Jan 14, 2012 10:30 AM - 1:00 PM
30 species

Canada Goose
Red-tailed Hawk
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Shrike
Blue Jay
American Crow
Horned Lark
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Lapland Longspur
American Tree Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Cedar Waxwing © 2012 Mike McDowell

1 comment:

  1. Nice to be reminded of this subtly beautiful bird. Even though they can be seen during the winter months in many areas, they always remind me of lazy summer days.

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